Category Archives: good people

2017 election results: victory for the left

By Joseph Ballin 11/15/ 2017 6:59 AM EST

For all the Hillarybots out there, I have just one question for you. Do you think we would have seen the left wing landslide win we saw last week if Hillary Clinton was president? As Jimmy Dore pointed out several times, Trump is a disaster, Trump can’t get anything done, he is destroying the Republican Party, and it’s better we get an ineffective fascist now, than an effective fascist later.

Andrea Jenkins (Minnesota Democratic–Farmer–Labor Party) was elected to the 8th Ward of the Minneapolis City Council. She is first African American openly trans woman to be elected to office in the United States. She was endorsed by Our Revolution. She’s very active in the trans community, including Trans Lives Matter. She’s a civil rights icon and a personal hero of mine.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/andreaforward8?lang=en

Lee Carter (Democratic Party/Democratic Socialists of America) was elected to the 50th district of the Virginia House of Delegate. He beat Jackson Miller, the majority whip for the Republicans in the Virginia House of Delegates. He won with almost no support from the Virginia Democratic Party.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/carterforva?lang=en

Larry Krasner (Democratic Party) was elected 26th District Attorney (DA) of Philadelphia. He beat Republican Beth Grossman. A lot of people don’t know DAs have vast power, they can choose which cases they want to peruse or not. Larry is pro-BLM, anti-death penalty (won’t hear a single death penalty case), anti-war on drugs, pro-Occupy wallstreet, wants to reign in the police.

Twitter: https://twitter.com/Krasner4DA?lang=en

Seema Singh Perez (Democratic Socialists of America) was elected to Third district of the Knoxville City Council. She is the first Indian-American elected council member.

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Seema3rddistrict/

Maine Question 2 was passed by Maine voters over the objections of Governor Paul LePage (biggest douche in a governorship). It expands Medicaid in the state of Maine. This is very good because Maine is an older state, a lot of Medicaid goes to pay for costs of old folks homes. LePage wants to delay this as much as possible just like anything else he touches.

Other interesting notes from this election. The Washington state legislature flipped Democratic and the Virginia House of Delegates is still in recount over who controls the chamber. In the Georgia state legislature, Democrats won three key seats there, making Republicans lose their super majority there.

Intercept coverage of progressive wins this election:

https://theintercept.com/2017/11/08/a-year-after-trump-democrats-socialists-and-populists-sweep-elections/

A podcast in review: The Jimmy Dore Show

By Joseph Ballin 7/20/2017 4:50 PM EST

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This is a new segment I’m gonna be working on for a bit. I’m gonna review ALL of the podcasts I’m currently listening to. And I’m gonna start with The Jimmy Dore Show.

The Jimmy Dore Show podcast

The Jimmy Dore Show is a podcast started and hosted by political comedian and commentator Jimmy Dore. The podcast was created in 2009 and has exploded in listeners since the creation of this podcast. The show is a blend of comedy, news, and interviews. The podcast lasts one hour and comes out every week on Friday. Jimmy hosts the show with co-hosts Ron Placone and the miserable liberal Stefane Zamorano.

As opposed to many podcasts, The Jimmy Dore Show covers topics that no other podcast will cover. For example, Jimmy interviewed war journalist Eva Bartlett, who has BEEN to Syria and has covered exclusively what’s really going on in Syria, the propaganda being spewed by US imperialists, the al-Qaeda white helmets, etc. Jimmy isn’t exclusively anti-Trump/anti-Republican. While, Jimmy will attack them when it’s appropriate, he will not focus all his time on them, because he says the world is already bashing Trump and the Republicans.

Jimmy tends to focus on attacking the Democratic party and the mainstream media. Jimmy openly states that both parties are shit and we need to create a third party that will take on the Democratic and Republican parties. So a lot of people criticize him because he only focuses on the Democratic Party. People complain that he’s still talking about Hillary. First of all, if you don’t like his podcast you can always not listen. Secondly, Hillary is still running the Democratic Party. She still has massive influence. For example, she started a super pac this year and Obama picked a Clinton friendly DNC chairman.

Jimmy has made a lot of enemies because of his critic of the mainstream Democratic party establishment. He’s gotten into two debates with Sam Seder of the Majority Report over the issue of voting for Hillary Clinton in 2016. In 2017, the Washington Post, owned by billionaire Jeff Bezos and has hundred of millions of dollars in contracts with the CIA, has smeared him as a “conspiracy theorist”, a term created by the CIA.

The Jimmy Dore Show premium podcast

Also if you want more of the Jimmy Dore show, he’s got a premium podcast as well, which you have to pay for and you can get on The Jimmy Dore Show app. Sometimes these premium episodes are less about politics and more about behind the scenes from his comedy career. Sometimes it will cover politics, but mostly you learn stuff about Jimmy that you won’t learn in the regular podcast. For example, I didn’t know Jimmy Dore was an atheist and formally a fan of Sam Harris, but later turned against Sam Harris for his hawkish foreign policy.

Overall rating

I would give the Jimmy Dore podcast a 9.5/10. It isn’t corporate media, it tells you stuff no other podcasts covers, it has comedy and serious news segments, and doesn’t censor opinion. Some will complain he doesn’t take calls, but I’m glad I don’t have to listen to Jimmy take calls about building state banks as the most important issue facing the country. I highly recommend The Jimmy Dore Podcast.

The People’s Party

This is a trigger warning, I am going to reference Jimmy Dore right off the bat
But thats not really what this song is about, its just a way to get your attention
this song is about Draft Bernie Dot Org and the people’s party

I like thinking about politics and I like marijuana,

I like the interview Jimmy Dore did with Nick Brana,
Draft bernie Dot ORG is the place
if you think the democrats are a disgrace,
and the media deserves a big pie in the face,
The People’s Party is a party for the whole human race.
I beg you all to remember that
Bernie is an independent…not a democrat.
Bernie should have won because he was the best,
And I think its clear he is still better than the rest,
Bernie’s not afraid to talk about greed,
Bernie’s not afraid to legalize weed!
He’s the only candidate who I thought was cool,
Although O’malley still would have been better than you know who.
May I never mention her name again.
Draft bernie Dot ORG is the place
if you think the democrats are a disgrace,
and the media deserves a big pie in the face,
The People’s Party is a party for the whole human race.

Charts about Cuba that will Turn Anyone into a Marxist

Originally published on August 13th in honor of Fidel Castro’s birthday, now reposted in honor of his death, here are some charts as eye openers for you throughout the day.  Don’t believe the propaganda.

Life Expectancy Since The Revolution
Infant Mortality

 

Unemployment rate
Death Rate
l

“Drug prohibition is the golden goose of terrorism”

The Judge is Wise.  Watch this video.

Via Ed Brayton, Judge Jim Gray, a conservative California judge with lots of experience fighting drugs, says the present policy benefits drug lords and terrorists among others. After laying out his case, Jones concludes the most patriotic thing he can do is work to repeal drug laws:

I like how the judge has to lay out his hardass bonafides before launching into his anti-prohibition arguments.  “I’m not a dirty hippie, dammit!”  Nixon to China and all that.  Hey man, whatever it takes!

Then there is the social justice argument that he leaves largely unsaid.  I caught some of this interview with Michelle Alexander last week, laying out the racial angle of the War on Drugs, and it’s pretty appalling.

The war on drugs waged in these ghetto communities has managed to brand as felons millions of people of color for relatively minor, nonviolent drug offenses. And once branded a felon, they’re ushered into a permanent second-class status, not unlike the one we supposedly left behind. Those labeled felons may be denied the right to vote, are automatically excluded from juries, and my be legally discriminated against in employment, housing, access to education, public benefits, much like their grandparents or great grandparents may have been discriminated against during the Jim Crow era.

[…]

The war on drugs, contrary to popular belief, was not declared in response to rising drug crime. Actually, the war on drugs, the current drug war, was declared in 1982 by President Ronald Reagan at a time when drug crime was actually on the decline. A few years later, crack cocaine hit the streets in poor communities of color across America, and the Reagan administration hired staff to publicize crack babies, crack mothers, crack dealers in inner-city communities, in an effort to build public support and more funding, and ensure more funding, for the new war that had been declared. But the drug war had relatively little to do with drug crime, even from the outset.

The drug war was launched in response to racial politics, not drug crime. The drug war was part of the Republican Party’s grand strategy, often referred to as the Southern strategy, an effort to appear—appeal to poor and working-class white voters who were threatened by, felt vulnerable, threatened by the gains of the civil rights movement, particularly desegregation, busing and affirmative action. And the Republican Party found that it could get Democrats—white, you know, working-class poor Democrats—to defect from the Democratic New Deal coalition and join the Republican Party through racially coded political appeals on issues of crime and welfare.

Lovely.  Part II of the interview is here.

Say “Chowdah”

(via)

Also:

Senator Kennedy called health care reform “the cause of my life.” We’ve seen comments from across the country saying the Senate should pass the strong reform bill that came out of Kennedy’s health committee — which includes the public health insurance option — and name it “The Kennedy Bill” in his honor.

We agree. So we created a petition to the Senate that we’ll deliver Monday — can you sign it?

PETITION: “Ted Kennedy was a courageous champion for health care reform his entire life. In his honor, name the reform bill that passed Kennedy’s health committee ‘The Kennedy Bill’ — then pass it, and nothing less, through the Senate.”

Please click here to add your name.

In less than an hour, over 1,000 people have already signed! All signatures will be hand-delivered to the offices of Harry Reid and other key senators in Washington DC next Monday, August 31 — just as the Senate is returning from August recess.

Senators will soon choose between Kennedy’s bill and another being written by conservative Democrats and Republicans, which likely will not include a public option. Let’s honor Kennedy’s memory by naming his own bill after him — and telling his Senate colleagues it would be a disgrace to vote against it or to water it down.

Can you join us? Click here to add your name.

Then, please forward this email to others.

UPDATE:

Kagro makes the excellent point not to let the hypocrites slap Kennedy’s name on just any old health reform bill, but instead make sure it’s tied specifically to the public option.

Muntadher al-Zaidi

Today, Muntadher al-Zaidi was sentenced to 3 years in jail for throwing two shoes at George W. Bush. Muntadher al-Zaidi is my hero. This from CNN

“I could only see Bush and feel the blood of the innocents flow under his feet, as he was smiling that smile — as if he had come to bid farewell to Iraq and with the last support and more than 1 million martyrs,” al-Zaidi said. “At that moment, I felt this is the man who killed our nation … the main murderer and the main person responsible for killing our nation.”

Speaking in his first public appearance since his arrest two months ago, al-Zaidi told the court he “got emotional and threw the shoe at him” and “the second one was involuntary.”

“I had no intention to kill the commander of the occupying forces … even if I had a weapon … I was expressing my inner feelings and those of all the Iraqi people from east to west and north to south and the feelings of hatred they hold for him,” he said.

Al-Zaidi told the judge that he had intended to humiliate Bush in the past. As Bush listed the gains made in Iraq during the mid-December news conference, al-Zaidi said he was thinking about the millions of civilians who had been killed, widowed or displaced. He talked about the sanctity of mosques being violated, the rape of women and daily humiliations.

“I don’t know what accomplishments he was talking about. The accomplishments I could see were the more than 1 million martyrs and a sea of blood,” al-Zaidi said. “There are more than 5 million Iraqi orphans because of the occupation. … More than a million widows and more than 3 million displaced because of the occupation.”

If you truly hate hypocrisy, how could you resist throwing your shoe at GW Bush?

No one Everyone Expects the Spanish Inquisition

We haven’t kicked around the torture question on this website yet. Not whether we oppose it (I presume we all do), but whether or not we need to see some upcoming prosecutions, truth commissions, all of the above, none of the above. The US presidency has a pretty shameful history of absolving the previous administration’s criminal actions (see Watergate, Iran-Contra, et al.), so I am not particularly hopeful about prosecutions. As for the 9/11 style truth commissions… if everyone already has immunity and prosecutions are off the table, who exactly in the intelligence community is going to come forth and sully their reputation? The best we can hope for is probably a few declassified memos and a newfound condemnation of torture practices.

To me, the speculation on whether or not Bush will preemptively pardon those responsible for the torture regime is a joke. The power players would never allow the new administration to make that kind of trouble. (Indeed, the apologists love to claim that big name Democratic congressmen were always in the know). So why would he acknowledge the criminality of his people’s behavior with a pardon? Honestly, I would love to see those pardons, because it would not only be an effective admission of guilt, but would also signify a real fear that “change is gonna come”.

All of this is a somewhat long way of highlighting this op-ed article from today’s Washington Post by a US interrogator in Iraq who was opposed to the use of torture techniques.

I know the counter-argument well — that we need the rough stuff for the truly hard cases, such as battle-hardened core leaders of al-Qaeda, not just run-of-the-mill Iraqi insurgents. But that’s not always true: We turned several hard cases, including some foreign fighters, by using our new techniques. A few of them never abandoned the jihadist cause but still gave up critical information. One actually told me, “I thought you would torture me, and when you didn’t, I decided that everything I was told about Americans was wrong. That’s why I decided to cooperate.”

Torture and abuse are against my moral fabric. The cliche still bears repeating: Such outrages are inconsistent with American principles. And then there’s the pragmatic side: Torture and abuse cost American lives.

I learned in Iraq that the No. 1 reason foreign fighters flocked there to fight were the abuses carried out at Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo. Our policy of torture was directly and swiftly recruiting fighters for al-Qaeda in Iraq. The large majority of suicide bombings in Iraq are still carried out by these foreigners. They are also involved in most of the attacks on U.S. and coalition forces in Iraq. It’s no exaggeration to say that at least half of our losses and casualties in that country have come at the hands of foreigners who joined the fray because of our program of detainee abuse. The number of U.S. soldiers who have died because of our torture policy will never be definitively known, but it is fair to say that it is close to the number of lives lost on Sept. 11, 2001. How anyone can say that torture keeps Americans safe is beyond me — unless you don’t count American soldiers as Americans.

This dude has evidently written a book about his experiences and the “false choice between torture and terror”. Sadly, he still feels the need to write under a false name for fear of reprisals. This truth stuff is serious business.

The O’Franken Factor

Franken pulled me in to Air America. I know ‘some people’ found his show kinda corny but I loved it. For that reason and because I think he’ll do some good in Congress, I’m really hoping he comes out on top. Anyone else looking for some decent analysis on his prospects, check out this research. Synopsis: history says he has a great chance to make up the ~200 vote deficit, but just barely.

* * * Uila Update * * *

A 200 vote difference is statistical insanity. Though I suspect the insanity is only just beginning

The recount in the Minnesota Senate race hasn’t even begun yet, but already the GOP is working to delegitimize it in advance, by smearing the man who will run it as a partisan Democrat.

[…] the GOP gambit […] appears to be to cast public doubt on the integrity of the recount process, thereby bolstering Coleman’s claim that’s he’s the rightful winner and that a recount is unnecessary — just the strategy pursued by George Bush’s campaign in Florida in 2000.

Indeed, Coleman’s shrinking lead in the first count has already prompted him to try to question the ongoing vote counting. A lawyer for the campaign yesterday told The Politico: “We’re not going to sit idly by, while mysterious, statistically dubious changes in vote totals take place after official government offices close.”